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Diabetic Foot


People with diabetes often have trouble with their feet. Part of the problem is that the loss of feeling in your feet makes it hard for you to tell if you have a blister or sore. If little sores aren't taken care of, they can get worse and turn into ulcers (serious, deep sores). If these ulcers become infected, you may have to go to the hospital or, in very serious cases, have a foot amputated (removed). This handout will give you some tips on how to care for your feet.

How can I avoid problems with my feet?

Keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible. Also, follow your doctor's advice on diet, exercise and medicine. Here are some other ways to protect your feet:

  • Wash your feet every day with lukewarm (not hot) water and mild soap.
  • Dry your feet well, especially between the toes. Use a soft towel and pat gently; don't rub.
  • Keep the skin of your feet smooth by applying a cream or lanolin lotion, especially on the heels. If the skin is cracked, talk to your doctor about how to treat it.
  • Keep your feet dry by dusting them with nonmedicated powder before putting on shoes, socks or stockings.
  • Check your feet every day. You may need a mirror to look at the bottoms of your feet. Call your doctor at the very first sign of redness, swelling, pain that doesn't go away,
    or numbness or tingling in any part of your foot.
  • Don't treat calluses, corns or bunions without talking to your doctor first.
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails. It might help to soak your
    toenails in warm water to soften them before you cut them.
  • Don't let your feet get too hot or too cold.
  • Don't go barefoot.

Achilles Tendon | Ankle Instability | Ankle Sprains | Arthritic Foot & Ankle Care | Athletes Foot | Bunions |Calluses
Corns | Crush Injuries | Diabetic Foot | Flat Feet | Fungus Toenails | Geriatric Foot Care | Hammertoes | Heel Pain
Ingrown Toenails | Injuries | Neuromas | Plantar Fasciitis | Warts